ABOUT UNION

WHO WE ARE AND WHAT WE DO

ABOUT UNION

UNION DIRECT TRADE

MORE THAN JUST PAYING A FAIR PRICE

UNION DIRECT TRADE

BREWING TIPS

BREW COFFEE LIKE A PROFESSIONAL

BREWING TIPS


Like most food crops, coffee is a seasonal product. Luckily for us, not all coffee producing territories harvest at the same time, and some harvests are large enough to last roasteries the entire year – pretty important when you want consistent components in a blend. However, thanks to the coffee industry’s ever-increasing appetite for the new and unusual, seasonal coffees with a limited stock – often called microlots – have earned a significant position in the speciality market place.

What exactly is a microlot?

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At Union, we source a lot of coffee (around 75% of all our green coffee) from smallholders coffee farmers, when we source from smallholders we source through cooperatives.

Why is this?

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TAKEAWAY_CUPS

You may have seen all the stories in the news recently about the environmental concerns of takeaway cups. Whilst Union doesn’t own coffee shops, we do supply our coffee to many different independent coffee shops across the UK. As part of that relationship we often provide takeaway cups for their business. So we felt it really important to ensure we weren’t contributing to the problem.

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int_womens_day_1

Did you know that women play an important role in coffee production? They do most of the work and are therefore directly responsible for the quality of the coffee. Their work often goes unrecognized and unpaid. On international women’s day we want to share with you how Union adresses gender equality.

When coffee was first introduced into England in the late 1600s, it was largely drunk by men and only men. In coffeehouses rather than at home. Doctors welcomed this as a substitute for drinking alcohol in taverns, but women were not so happy. In 1674 an unknown author put out “The Women’s Petition Against Coffee”.

English coffee houses in the 17th and 18th century were also called penny houses, referring to the entry fee of a penny. Coffee houses were public, social places where people would meet for conversation and commerce while drinking coffee.

Not all historians agree on whether women were or were not allowed to enter coffeehouses. Yet, conversation certainly revolved around male centered subjects such as politics, business and cultural criticism. These topics were not supposed to concern women. A coffee house was no place for a lady who wished to remain respectable!

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